A RIBBON CUTTING was held Tuesday, March 14 at Curwood Castle to celebrate the opening of Curwood Castle for its 100th year. Among those who were there to celebrate were members of the Owosso Historical Society, Curwood Castle Docent Denice Grace, Owosso Mayor Robert J. Teich, Jr., Mayor Pro-Tem Susan Osika and Shiawassee Regional Chamber of Commerce Ambassadors. Proclamations from the Mayor’s Office of the City of Owosso, the House of Representatives and the State of Michigan were on display. 

(Independent Photo/Melissa Shepard)

 

  The 100th Anniversary of Curwood Castle was kicked off with a ribbon cutting Tuesday, March 14. Members of the Owosso Historical Society, Curwood Castle Docent Denice Grace, Owosso Mayor Robert J. Teich, Jr., Mayor Pro-Tem Susan Osika, representatives from U.S. Representative Elissa Slotkin and Senator Gary Peters, Shiawassee Regional Chamber of Commerce Ambassadors and many others were there to celebrate.

  Mark Erickson, President of the Owosso Historical Commission opened the celebration by speaking about the importance of Curwood Castle to the community and urged people to visit the castle this year. Next, Mayor Pro-Tem Susan Osika read the proclamation from the Mayor’s Office.

  James Oliver Curwood starting construction on Curwood Castle in 1922, finishing it in 1923. He built it as a replica of a Norman chateau along the banks of the Shiawassee River near his mother’s home. He used the castle as his writing studio and office. Curwood wrote more than 30 novels that were estimated to have been read by over 7 million people during his time and whose stories were turned into major motion pictures in Hollywood. Curwood later became a zealous conservationist and was appointed to the Michigan Conservation Commission in 1926. 

  Curwood’s legacy lies in his writings that acted as a liaison between the masses and nature. What Curwood did, perhaps not by design but inadvertently, was to lead millions of readers a step closer to an appreciation for nature and wildlife.

  He passed away in 1927, at the age of 49, and willed the castle to the City of Owosso. It served in various roles over the years and officially became a museum on Nov. 8, 1970. 

  Curwood Castle is open to visitors on Tuesdays through Sundays from 1 to 5 p.m.

 

 

Curwood Castle Celebrating 100th Anniversary was last modified: March 21st, 2023 by Karen Elford